Bike brakes

brakes Fixes, Reviews & Guides

Embedded thumbnail for How to Install Hydraulic Disc Brakes

How to Install Hydraulic Disc Brakes

Installing disc brakes is more often than not, a considerable upgrade for anyone who is serious about their mountain biking. You won’t have to worry about wearing down your rims and about trying...

Type: Repair Tutorial
Embedded thumbnail for How to Bleed Shimano Hydraulic Disc Brakes

How to Bleed Shimano Hydraulic Disc Brakes

Hydraulic brakes work by applying pressure to a liquid in a tube. They work by means of a piston in the lever which shoots liquid into the caliper piston which causes the brakes to clamp...

Company: Shimano
Type: Repair Tutorial
Embedded thumbnail for How to Adjust and Straighten Disc Brakes

How to Adjust and Straighten Disc Brakes

Adjusting disc brakes is pretty straightforward. What you’ll need is a rubber band and an allen wrench.

Yep. That’s it.

To start, you’ll have to slightly loosen the mount bolts that...

Part brakes Disc
Company: Park
Type: Repair Tutorial
Disc Brakes

Disc Brake Basics: What Are They and How to Take Care of Them

On a bike, you’ve got either one of two types of brakes. You’ve got the caliper brakes or V-brakes, which look like a pair of pincers that pinch the rim of the wheel to stop. Or you’ve got the...

Part brakes Disc
Blog Tags: disc brake basics
Type: Blog entry
Embedded thumbnail for How to String Brake Cables

How to String Brake Cables

Stringing brake cables is pretty straightforward.

You’ll need:

  • Allen wrench
  • Cable cutters
  • Brake housing
  • Brake cable
  • Ferrule
  • Cable...
    Company: Truvativ
    Type: Repair Tutorial
  • Embedded thumbnail for Mountain Bike V-Brake Adjustment

    Mountain Bike V-Brake Adjustment

    Rim brakes are simple. Rim brakes are fun. Rim brakes sometimes need adjusting. If you pull the lever and the brakes are still loosy goosey, then it's time to tighten up the tension on...

    Company: Shimano
    Type: Repair Tutorial
    Embedded thumbnail for How To Adjust Sidepull Brakes on a Road Bike

    How To Adjust Sidepull Brakes on a Road Bike

    Misaligned brake pads can cause a decrease of braking power, or even a blowout! With 5 minutes of your time, you can ensure that you have the ability to stop when you're supposed to. Here's the...

    Company: Park
    Type: Repair Tutorial
    Embedded thumbnail for How To Adjust Brakes on a Road Bike

    How To Adjust Brakes on a Road Bike

     

    Part brakes Rim
    Tools hex wrench
    Company: Shimano
    Type: Repair Tutorial
    Embedded thumbnail for How to Bleed Hayes Hydraulic Brakes

    How to Bleed Hayes Hydraulic Brakes

    First things first: the Hayes system uses DOT 3 or DOT 4 mechanical brake fluid. DO NOT USE MINERAL OIL FOR THESE BRAKES!!!!!!!

    Second, the bleed starts from the caliper up to the brake...

    Company: Hayes
    Type: Repair Tutorial

    We spend so much time worried about finding that next gear, we rarely invest in the things that can safely slow us down. Chew on that for a second. 

    Know the hardware: Cyclists realize that brake performance affects more than just injury prevention. Slowing to the perfect speed just before taking a corner, or rolling down rock steps when mountain biking, properly adjusted brakes maintain control that leads to better handling. There are generally two main forms of brakes, each having equal but opposite pros and cons.

    Rim Brakes - The stopping power comes from calipers closing the brake pads on the side of the rim. Cheap, lightweight and simple, rim brakes are found on almost all road bikes. Road cycling involves a (usually) clean riding surface that the rider can see a significant distance. Contact between the track and the tire is minimized to allow less friction, and higher speeds. Rim brakes provide sufficient stopping power for small frames, and their slender and lightweight profile cuts back resistance. However, the rim can pick up water and debris in bad riding weather, which interferes with brake pads and braking power.

    Disc Brakes - The major fundamental difference here is that the caliper clamps to a brake rotor in the middle of the wheel, not the side of the rim. This allows increased distance from the dirt and mud, and more braking contact without the mess. Rotors are usually made from hard alloys or ceramic materials to handle a heavier brake load, with calculated holes cut out for heat and debris dissipation. Disc brakes can be actuated by mechanical or hydraulic cables. All the extra equipment makes for a really heavy braking system, but when your life depends on it, there's no compromising. This is the main reason disc brakes are the standard on cliff-teetering, trail-jumping mountain bikes.

    Maintenance and Installation difficulty (2-6/10): Healthy brakes have much to do with proper alignment to the wheel/rotor, and cable tension that's just right when the lever is squeezed. That being said, repairs and installations can vary in complexity and difficulty. Centering a rim brake caliper around the wheel takes 30 seconds, but installing a hydraulic disc brake system might be more headaches than you bargained for. We have a number of tutorials below to show what you're getting into before the disassembly begins.

    Things you might need along the way:

    • Repair stand - Always remember to get that bike off the ground and up by your face. 
    • Hex/Torx wrenches - Bolts and screws on brake assemblies will be shed during battle.
    • Spoke wrench - Brakes shouldn't be such a drag. True the wheel! 
    • Beer - Brakes are best operated on in the company of good friends. The kind of friends that don't accept Visa or MasterCard.